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Councilmembers Rasmussen and Bagshaw’s Statement on Belltown Property Landmark Nomination

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 10/9/2015

Councilmembers Rasmussen and Bagshaw’s Statement on Belltown Property Landmark Nomination

SEATTLE – Councilmembers Tom Rasmussen and Sally Bagshaw issued the following statement today on the Seattle Landmark Board’s decision to nominate the Wayne Apartments at 2224 2nd Avenue as an historic landmark:

“We are very pleased with the decision of the Board to designate the Wayne Apartments as an historic landmark.  The building is one of the few remaining structures from the late 19th century, and may be the only building of its kind to survive the monumental effort to regrade Denny Hill. We are glad to see such an important successful step toward retaining the structure as a piece of Seattle’s living history.

“Wednesday night over one hundred community members spent hours at the Landmarks Board meeting, making the case for preservation.  Today, we enthusiastically congratulate them for their work and this historic decision. These are neighbors who truly consider themselves family.  We thank them for the countless hours of research and community organizing, and look forward to continuing to work with the neighborhood to ensure this rare part of Belltown showcases its history of music, art and film, and with this action starts a new chapter.”

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Mayor to move forward on acquisition of NE 130th Street beach

City of Seattle
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 8/13/2015

Mayor to move forward on acquisition of N.E. 130th Street beach

SEATTLE – Mayor Ed Murray today announced that the City plans to purchase portions of two properties that make up the former N.E. 130th Street beach from the current owners and restore waterfront access for the public.

“For decades, generations of Seattle residents enjoyed lakefront access from the N.E. 130th Street beach,” said Mayor Murray. “I have directed the Parks Department to begin the process of restoring that access by acquiring the properties using all tools at our disposal.” 

The two properties lie at the end of N.E. 130th Street and Rivera Place, near the Burke-Gilman Trail in the Cedar Park neighborhood in the Lake City area. Earlier this year, the private property owners restricted the public from accessing the waterfront.

“This parcel bordering Lake Washington has been used by the public to gain access to the water for over 80 years. It was very unfortunate to have access denied,” said Councilmember Jean Godden. “It’s great news that the City is now taking affirmative steps to restore this property to the public and to neighbors who know how much it matters to save this beach.”

“Privatizing public property based upon an 82 year-old records error is a disservice to the neighborhood,” said Councilmember Nick Licata. “I commend the Mayor for joining the Council in reclaiming what has long served as the only public access to Lake Washington between Matthews Beach and the northern city limits.”

“I visited the 130th Street beach with neighbors and community members and stand firmly behind them in their desire to have the beach end returned to its original use—a neighborhood park,” said Councilmember Sally Bagshaw. “Many congratulations to the community who worked hard to ensure this space is open and welcoming to the community.”

“When public access to Lake Washington was taken away, community activists pushed the City to recover it,” said Councilmember Kshama Sawant. “Generations in Lake City will be able to swim in the neighborhood due to their organizing efforts.”

Under the Mayor’s direction, Seattle Parks and Recreation will send a purchase and sale agreement to the current owners. The owners will then have 30 days to agree with the terms, counter-offer, or decline. In the event a negotiated purchase of the portions of the properties cannot be reached, the Mayor will transmit an ordinance to City Council authorizing the use of eminent domain to acquire the parcels for public use and benefit.

“The 130th Street beach has provided recreational access to Lake Washington for residents since 1932,” said Dave Pope of the Friends of 130th Street Beach community group. “As Seattle continues to grow, more parks are needed, not fewer. I applaud Mayor Murray and City Council for taking the first steps in restoring beach access for those who do not have the luxury of owning waterfront property.”  

“Shoreline access is precious everywhere in Seattle,” said Jesús Aguirre, Superintendent of Seattle Parks and Recreation. “We constantly strive to increase park and recreation opportunities for our residents and restoring this property to public use provides critical access for the community.”

In June, the City Council sent Mayor Murray a letter urging him to condemn the properties. The letter was signed by all members of the Council.

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Councilmember Bagshaw Statement on Department of Neighborhoods Director Appointment

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 5/8/2015
Councilmember Bagshaw Statement on Department of Neighborhoods Director Appointment
SEATTLE – Councilmember Sally Bagshaw, chair of the Utilities & Neighborhoods Committee, today issued the following statement in…

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Council to Authorize Pike Place Market Expansion to the Waterfront

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 3/17/2015
Council to Authorize Pike Place Market Expansion to the Waterfront
SEATTLE – A Council committee unanimously approved an agreement to expand the Pike Place Market yesterday, which will connect the current Pike Place…

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Mayor, Council Call for Review of Shell’s Arctic Drilling Fleet Permits at Port of Seattle’s Terminal 5

City of Seattle
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 3/9/2015

Mayor, Council Call for Review of Shell’s Arctic Drilling Fleet Permits at Port of Seattle’s Terminal 5

SEATTLE – Mayor Ed Murray and the Seattle City Council announced today that Seattle’s Department of Planning and Development (DPD) will review, investigate and determine whether the plans at Port of Seattle’s Terminal 5 to host Shell Oil’s Arctic drilling fleet are allowed under the current Shoreline Substantial Development Permit granted to Terminal 5.

Reports indicate that Shell Oil would moor vessels that are returning from drilling in the Artic. In the past, Shell’s drilling fleet has needed extensive repairs, maintenance and conversions after returning from a season of drilling. These activities may substantially change Terminal 5’s use and require new, different permits than the one currently granted by DPD which could require additional environmental review if the Port wishes to move forward with the lease.

“Any project of this apparent significance to our industrial lands must go through the appropriate review. It’s important that the public and surrounding businesses are informed of all the possible impacts of this lease – both economic and environmental – and that these impacts are sufficiently disclosed and evaluated,” Murray said. “This is why I’m directing DPD to conduct a thorough review of the Terminal 5 proposal and determine if the anticipated activities at the terminal involving the Shell drilling fleet require new permits before it can proceed.”

“I have grave concerns about Shell Oil’s Arctic drilling fleet coming to Puget Sound in a damaged state, discharging oil and other toxic pollutants along our shorelines during transport and repair, jeopardizing the local ecosystem and undoing decades of work to clean up the Sound,” said Councilmember Mike O’Brien. “Shell’s track record with the Noble Discoverer in the Arctic includes eight felony offenses relating to environmental and maritime crimes, such as discharging oil-contaminated water directly overboard, which is simply unacceptable.”

“For years the Port and the City have worked together to develop rational solutions and develop alternative treatment technologies to reduce pollution in the Duwamish and Elliott Bay,” said Councilmember Sally Bagshaw. “While the immediate value of a lease to repair Arctic drilling equipment may appear to be high, we believe this agreement is shortsighted and ignores the long-term costs to our economy and environment.” 

The current permit, called a Shoreline Substantial Development Permit, designated Terminal 5 as a “cargo terminal” – usually meaning goods are stored and ultimately transferred from this terminal to other carriers or locations. But if the Artic drilling fleet is actually being moored and repaired at Terminal 5, there could be significant and adverse impacts on the surrounding environment. As part of DPD’s investigation and fact-finding, the Department will begin working with the Port of Seattle to clarify all of the activities anticipated at Terminal 5, including, but not limited to, the types of vessels to be moored and the maintenance and repairs to be conducted.

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Office of the Mayor

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Taking Care of Those who Take Care of Us

I am a major fan of my downtown neighborhood.   Here are a few of my favorite businesses and neighbors within a few blocks of my downtown home: ANCIENT GROUNDS:  I buy superb coffee from Roland Crawford (and occasionally some of his amazing art) at Ancient Grounds on 1st Avenue just south of University Street.  Here’s […]

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Councilmember Statements Regarding Final Adoption of City Budget

City of Seattle
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 11/24/2014

Councilmember Statements Regarding Final Adoption of City Budget

SEATTLE – The City Council gave final approval to the 2015 City Budget by a 8-1 vote at the today’s Full Council meeting.

Councilmember Nick Licata, chair of the Budget Committee, said, “I’d like to thank members of the public for their involvement in helping the Council craft the 2015 City budget. Public involvement resulted in a more responsive city budget that emphasizes human services, social justice and labor standards.”  Councilmember Licata added, “In an effort to reach out to more people than in the past, I’ll be initiating a community participatory budget process for next year’s budget.”

In a letter to the Mayor in early August, the Council identified the Council’s highest priorities for the 2015-2016 biennium. Councilmembers voted to enhance the proposed budget Mayor Ed Murray delivered on September 22 with greater emphasis on human services, social justice and labor standards. A summary of the major Council’s budget modifications is available online.

“From public health funding to enhanced worker protections to early learning investments, the 2015 budget responds to our city’s critical needs and advances groundbreaking policies,” said Council President Tim Burgess.

Councilmember Jean Godden said, “I’m tremendously proud of the Council’s support to set aside funds to establish paid parental leave in 2015. It is one example of our commitment to end the gender wage gap and support our valued employees.”

“We continue to focus on adding more police officers, but it is not just about more people. We need to more effectively deploy the current officers into our neighborhoods and ensure communities feel our officers are helping in the prevention of crime. Chief O’Toole is leading Seattle in the right direction with the mantra of using accurate and timely data, rapidly deploying crime reduction plans and commanding relentless follow-up,” said Councilmember Bruce A. Harrell. “Additional public safety investments include alley activation in the Chinatown/International District, block watch academies, summer safety activities, mobile domestic violence assistance and a potential pilot for an acoustic gunshot locator system.”

“I am proud of the steps City Council is taking to address income inequality in our city through this budget,” said Councilmember Mike O’Brien. “We’ve passed some great laws recently to support workers – from $15/hour to paid sick leave to protections against wage theft – but I led Council’s effort to significantly increase funding for the new Office of Labor Standards to ensure that workers know their rights and know how to exercise them. I also helped provide additional funding for our upcoming priority hire legislation, which aims to employ those people in our city who most need the work on City construction projects. I’m also happy the Council sped up $15/hour for all City employees to take effect next year.”

“The 2015-2016 budget package includes investments in many areas important to me, including human services, public health and public safety to make Seattle a safer, healthier place for everyone,” said Councilmember Sally Bagshaw. “It also emphasizes commitments to improve our public spaces, making every Seattle neighborhood more welcoming and connected. Thanks to my colleagues and the Mayor’s Office for their collaborative spirit and willingness to find new solutions.”

“I am excited that the Council agreed to fund the Neighborhood Conservation District program. When the program is established next year, neighborhoods will have a strong land use tool to accommodate growth and development that respects community history and character,” said Councilmember Tom Rasmussen, the sponsor of the new program.

Councilmember Sally J. Clark said, “With this budget, we’re making strong investments that will save lives across our city. Thank you to the advocates, community members and program participants themselves who have shaped those investments.”

“The movement for a People’s Budget has won important improvements to the Mayor’s business-as-usual budget, and we will not stop fighting until the needs of regular people in Seattle are met, such as affordable housing and an end to regressive taxation,” said Councilmember Kshama Sawant.

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Councilmember Bagshaw’s Statement on Woodland Park Zoo’s Elephant Move

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 11/19/2014
Councilmember Bagshaw’s Statement on Woodland Park Zoo’s Elephant Move
Seattle – Councilmember Sally Bagshaw issued the following statement regarding the Woodland Park Zoo’s announcement today that the elephant pr…

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Council Secures City Support for Urban Rest Stop Funding

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 11/18/2014
SEATTLE – Councilmember Sally Bagshaw issued the following statement today after completing a visit with patrons of the Urban Rest Stop downtown location:
“Hygiene is a critical weapon in the fight against conta…

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Coffee Conversation with Councilmembers Sally J. Clark and Sally Bagshaw next Saturday

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 9/26/2014
Coffee Conversation with Councilmembers Sally J. Clark and Sally Bagshaw next Saturday
SEATTLE – City Councilmembers Sally J. Clark and Sally Bagshaw will be at Northeast Branch Public Library in Ravenna-Bryant nex…

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