• Search Council Connection



  • Council Photostream



    Archives





City to Celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. with ‘Unity’ Events

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 1/13/2016

City to Celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. with ‘Unity’ Events

Mayor, Council and Community to Celebrate MLK with Workshops, Musical Performances

SEATTLE – Mayor Ed Murray, Council President Bruce A. Harrell and members of the Seattle City Council, along with community leaders, and City employees, invite the public to celebrate Dr. King’s legacy, and to live out his vision, by participating in the second annual Martin Luther King Day Celebration at Seattle City Hall.

Thursday’s all-day event will include exhibits, workshops, remarks from the Mayor, Councilmembers and the City Attorney, as well as a reading by the City’s first-ever Civic Poet, and musical performances.

The event is free and the public is welcome to attend.

WHAT: Martin Luther King, Jr. ‘Unity’ Events

WHEN:  7:15 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. (NOTE: A complete schedule of events is available ONLINE)

Selected highlights include:

  • 8:30 – 10:55 a.m. Workshop Presenters -Former Assistant Superintendent Erin Jones and Gerald Hankerson, NAACP Director 
  • 11:15 a.m. Walter Kilgore Memorial Color Guard – US National Anthem / Black National Anthem Medley presented by Pat Wright, Seattle’s First Lady of Gospel
  • Remarks by Honorary Chair Mayor Edward Murray, Council President Bruce A. Harrell, Councilmember Tim Burgess, City Attorney Pete Holmes and Former Assistant Superintendent Erin Jones
  • Emcee Isiah Anderson,CaptainJohn Hayes (Seattle Police Department), and featuring the City’s Civic Poet Claudia Castro Luna
  • Key Note Speaker – Director Stephan Blanford, Seattle Public Schools
  • Introduction of Musical Guest Josephine Howell

The celebration will close with music by Gabriel Teodros, D.J. Sureal.

WHERE: City Hall, 600 4th Avenue, Seattle, WA

WHO: Elected officials, community leaders and the public

###

Seattle City Council meetings are cablecast live on Seattle Channel 21, HD Channels 321 Comcast, 721 Wave and on the City Council’s website. Copies of legislation, Council meeting calendar, and archives of news releases can be found on the City Council website. Follow the Council on Twitter,Facebook and on Flickr.

[View in Council Newsroom]

[Full Post]

Council Approves Sustainable City Employee Pension Program, Saves Taxpayers $200 Million Over 30 Years

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 1/11/2016

Council Approves Sustainable City Employee Pension Program, Saves Taxpayers $200 Million Over 30 Years

SEATTLE – Council unanimously approved legislation today that will lead to a new defined benefit retirement plan for City employees expected to save the City $200 million over the next 30 years. The legislation, Council Bill 118604, implements a new collective bargaining agreement with four City labor unions that includes the new pension program alongside salary adjustments and other changes.

The retirement plan, called Seattle City Employees’ Retirement System (SCERS) II, will be available for new employees hired on and after January 1, 2017.  The new retirement system benefits better align with other public agencies in the Puget Sound region and were developed collaboratively with City labor unions.

“This new retirement plan is a win-win-win,” said Councilmember Tim Burgess, Chair of the City’s Retirement Board. “We’ve managed to retain a defined benefit pension system, which will help attract top talent to City agencies. Employees will contribute less from their salary, which means more money in their pockets now. And, over time, the City will save hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars.”

Following the 2008 recession, the City’s retirement system faced financial challenges after experiencing a 26.8% loss. In 2011, a City Council-sponsored report defined the challenges facing the system and offered alternatives to ensure the future sustainability of the system.

“We will maintain a strong defined benefit plan for our retirees, while ensuring that our pension system will be sustainable over the long term,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “City employees’ commitment to public service means they often make far less than they would in the private sector. We reached agreement with our union partners to generate substantial savings for the taxpayer, while also compensating our employees with a stable pension for their lifetime of work.”

The plan approved today is structured similarly to the current retirement plan, SCERS I, and will still provide an adequate retirement benefit to employees. Both employees and the City will contribute less to the program.  Currently the City and its employees contribute 15.8% of payroll to fund the benefits earned during the year.  In the new plan the contribution will drop to 11.9% of payroll.

“We’re saving money, ensuring a healthy retirement system going forward, and providing competitive benefits for our employees,” added Councilmember Burgess. “I’m grateful for the collaborative effort by the Mayor, Council and the City’s labor unions to reach this outcome.”

[View in Council Newsroom]

[Full Post]

Councilmember Juarez Takes Oath of Office, First Enrolled Native American to Serve on Seattle City Council

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 1/4/2016

Councilmember Juarez Takes Oath of Office, First Enrolled Native American to Serve on Seattle City Council

SEATTLECouncilmember Debora Juarez (District 5, North Seattle) took her ceremonial oath of office today, becoming the first enrolled Native American to serve on the Seattle City Council.  Councilmember Juarez is a member of the Blackfeet Nation. The following are her remarks delivered at the Seattle City Council inauguration ceremony on January 4, 2016:

“As you know, my name is Debora Juarez. I am an enrolled member of the Blackfeet Nation. The Blackfeet name is ‘Nah Too Yii Mis’Stuckie,’ which means ‘Holy Mountain Woman.’

“I am proud to represent the City of Seattle and am equally proud to represent District 5.

“Before I begin I want to honor and thank special people – they know who they are. Because, as we know, and as we learned in Indian Country, you don’t get here by yourself. This took me 45 years to get here, and there are good people out there – they know who they are; I can’t say every one of their names – but I couldn’t have done it without them. I want to give a special thanks to my daughters, Raven and Memphis. Of all people, they’ve scarified the most. They’ve watched their mom run out the door many times to a meeting, to court, to special session in Olympia, to litigation in another state, mediation in California, New York – somehow they understood what mom was doing. They were always there when I came home, and they were always there for support, and now they’re grown. I’m glad they’re out of the house <laughter>, leaving their fish behind (Marshawn, their foster fish).

“Today is historic. It is not historic because I’m Native American, or because I’m Latina. It’s historic because I am America. This is democracy. I am a product of 1970s War on Poverty programs, I am a product of affirmative action, I am a product of growing up poor, but knowing that education was the equalizer.

“I’m also the product of having mentors, like Uncle Billy Frank, Ramona Bennett – I could go on and on. Indian women, Indian leaders that have brought me here, and include Roberto Maestas AND Bernie Whitebear and, of course, Larry Gosset. Larry has known me for 25 years.

“Today is also historic because in 2013, the voters spoke very loudly – a mandate, 66 percent, I believe -for the district system.  I get to work with 8 esteemed Councilmembers, 6 of which will represent their neighborhoods, their districts, their communities. This is an opportunity to bring all of us closer together, to talk, and to move away from a lighted screen or voicemail. We will be engaged, we will be successful, and I’m proud to be a part of that.

“When we started a district system, many wondered ‘what will that mean?’ Well Indian Country knows what that means – you should live with the people you represent. You should see and be accessible, you should know where the schools are, where the lights are, whether there’s potholes, whether there needs to be gutters – that’s what we’re supposed to do – that’s democracy – is representing our people.  <applause>

“We represent the great city of Seattle, and I hear we have a good football team. And we honor the legacy and needs of our communities.  I’m honored to hold such an important place in history. I want to thank Seattle, I want to thank my supporters, and I want to thank District 5. I believe a sustainable city must be a fair city, a city that brings prompt and humane solutions that address the weakness of the non-empowered and disenfranchised. And I’m proud to work with these people, moving forward, that that’s our mandate.

“In conclusion I want to share a story, some insight from another one of my Inspirations. I had the honor of meeting her once, very briefly many years ago.

“Wilma ManKiller, Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation – First woman Chief of the Cherokee Nation, elected in 1985, 31 years ago.

“In 1992 Chief Wilma ManKiller was approached by an Elder of the Onieda Nation. And, he shared with her one of the prophecies he had heard: That this was the time of the Woman – a time for women to take on a more important role in society. This anonymous Onieda Man shared it was the “time of the Butterfly.”

“She smiled and thought of the recent appointment of Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, then Hillary Rodham Clinton’s work on health care, and other recent high profile women. She smiled. She thought it about it all day, and kept smiling.

“That is how I feel today. Like Wilma ManKiller, smiling and remembering how her friends described her: a woman who likes to dance along the edge of the room, like a butterfly.

“No fear.

“Thank you.”

 

Councilmember Debora Juarez's Inauguration

 

# # #

Seattle City Council meetings are cablecast live on Seattle Channel 21, HD Channels 321 Comcast, 721 Wave and on the City Council’s website. Copies of legislation, Council meeting calendar, and archives of news releases can be found on the City Council website. Follow the Council on Twitter and on Facebook.

[View in Council Newsroom]

[Full Post]

Councilmember Johnson Remarks from Seattle City Council Inauguration

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 1/4/2016

Councilmember Johnson Remarks from Seattle City Council Inauguration

SEATTLECouncilmember Rob Johnson (District 4, Northeast Seattle) delivered the following remarks at the Seattle City Council inauguration ceremony on January 4, 2016:

“Councilmembers, distinguished guests, friends, and family – I am honored to stand before you as District 4’s first representative and humbled by the trust you’ve placed in my passion for the city of Seattle.

“I want to send a heartfelt message of gratitude to everyone who helped me get here and provided guidance along the way, most importantly my wife Katie and our girls, whose collective patience and support knows no bounds.

“I ran for office not only to make the process of civic engagement more efficient and enjoyable for my constituents, but to be a voice at the table, helping to steer this city at a crucial juncture in our collective history.

“As the fastest growing major city in the country, the problems to solve and the hurdles to overcome are many as we work to keep pace with those who currently call Seattle their home and those who want to call Seattle their home. The time for making two year decisions has passed, and we must commit ourselves, as leaders of this city, to planning for 2065, not 2018.

“Recent initiatives such as our HALA recommendations and the Move Seattle levy lay an exceptional foundation for this type of long term planning, and I recognize the responsibility we as leaders of this city share is to balance that strategic visioning with hard and fast implementation.

“When I think of the Seattle I want my daughters to enjoy 50 years from now, it inspires my guiding vision and subsequently, the types of decisions I will make over the course of my term.

“I envision a transportation system that is efficient, affordable, safe and interconnected. I envision a decreased dependence on vehicles and the celebration of carbon neutrality in the not too distant future.

“I envision our neighborhoods and urban villages alike as communities where all have the opportunity to live, work, and play – regardless of socio-economic status. Where better planning, design and architectural innovation ensure new development improves quality of life and enhances the character of all our neighborhoods.

“And I envision an education system of the highest caliber, resulting from meaningful dialogue between the city and our school district to coordinate our growth strategies. I envision a system that provides not only a seat for every child in the classroom, but also access to a holistic education, one including the arts, that prepares our students for any path they choose to pursue.

“This vision comes with a responsibility to express opinions, propose solutions, to be bold – and a little bit wonky. My wonkiness ultimately stems from my passion for the role that cities play in our national, cultural landscape. In my opinion, the best cities thrive when focused on the quality of life of each and every one if its’ residents, and the efficiency of its infrastructure. Cities work optimally when both the private and the public sectors come together in the spirit of collaboration. Cities don’t necessarily succeed by having the most money in their coffer, but by finding creative solutions that make an impact. And cities have the opportunity to provide leading innovations in the absence of action at the state and federal level.

“Seattle is an incredible city built to inspire and engage – and recent examples including December’s vote allowing ride-share drivers to unionize, and our response to homelessness make me very proud to play a part in this city’s future. 

“Today marks a milestone in Seattle’s history as we commence a council term characterized by district representation. So to conclude, and to recognize this occasion, I’d like to give each of my fellow council members this mug from the University of Washington. Let it represent how honored I am to represent District 4 and to work alongside you all to make Seattle a more livable, equitable, and enjoyable city. Thank you.”

# # #

Seattle City Council meetings are cablecast live on Seattle Channel 21, HD Channels 321 Comcast, 721 Wave and on the City Council’s website. Copies of legislation, Council meeting calendar, and archives of news releases can be found on the City Council website. Follow the Council on Twitter and on Facebook.

[View in Council Newsroom]

[Full Post]

Councilmembers Inaugurated in First District-Based Representation System Since 1910, Harrell Elected Council President

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 1/4/2016

Councilmembers Inaugurated in First District-Based Representation System Since 1910, Harrell Elected Council President

SEATTLE – All nine Seattle City Councilmembers took their oaths of office in the traditional inauguration ceremony in City Council Chambers today, following their successful victories in last November’s election. Newly elected Councilmembers Lorena Gonzalez, Lisa Herbold, Rob Johnson and Debora Juarez joined returning re-elected Councilmembers Sally Bagshaw, Tim Burgess, Bruce Harrell, Mike O’Brien and Kshama Sawant in taking their seats at the Council dais.

Family, friends, colleagues and community members filled the Seattle City Council chambers to celebrate the new and returning local government leadership. Each elected official was sworn in by someone of their choice and gave brief remarks.

Following their oaths, Councilmembers elected Councilmember Bruce Harrell to the position of Council President. Harrell has served as Seattle City Councilmember since 2008 and most recently chaired the Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology Committee.  The Council President is the presiding officer of the Council, sets the Full Council agenda, assigns legislation to committees and is the primary point of contact for external agencies.  When the Mayor is absent from the City or incapacitated, the Council President assumes the duties and responsibilities of the Mayor.

Today’s historic oath of office ceremony ushered in first district-based representation system since 1910. Seven of the Councilmembers will now each represent a geographical district, while two Councilmembers will each represent the entire city:

  • District 1 (West Seattle, South Park): Councilmember Lisa Herbold
  • District 2 (Southeast Seattle): Council President Bruce Harrell
  • District 3 (Central Area, Capitol Hill): Councilmember Kshama Sawant
  • District 4 (Ravenna, Wallingford): Councilmember Rob Johnson
  • District 5 (North Seattle): Councilmember Debora Juarez
  • District 6 (Fremont, Ballard): Councilmember Mike O’Brien
  • District 7 (Downtown, Magnolia): Councilmember Sally Bagshaw
  • At-Large (city-wide): Councilmember Tim Burgess
  • At-Large (city-wide): Councilmember Lorena Gonzalez

 

Click here for an interactive tool to help find which Council district you live in.

Today’s inaugural ceremony also marked a series of notable firsts in Seattle local government history:

  • First Enrolled Native American Councilmember – Debora Juarez
  • First Latina Councilmembers – Lorena Gonzalez and Debora Juarez
  • First Japanese American/African American Council President and first African American Council President since Council President Sam Smith in 1986-1989 – Bruce Harrell
  • First Female Majority City Council since 1998 – Sally Bagshaw, Lorena Gonzalez Lisa Herbold, Debora Juarez and Kshama Sawant

 

Councilmembers also took their first votes in their 2016-2017 term and assigned committee chairs. Each Councilmember is responsible for heading a Council committee and managing legislation related to that committee’s focus:

  • Council President Bruce Harrell, Chair: Education, Equity and Governance
  • Councilmember Tim Burgess, Chair: Affordable Housing, Neighborhoods and Finance
  • Councilmember Sally Bagshaw, Chair: Human Services and Public Health
  • Councilmember Lorena Gonzalez, Chair: Gender Equity, Safe Communities and New Americans
  • Councilmember Lisa Herbold: Chair: Civil Rights, Utilities, Economic Development and Arts
  • Councilmember Rob Johnson, Chair: Planning, Land Use and Zoning
  • Councilmember Debora Juarez, Chair: Parks, Seattle Center, Libraries and Waterfront
  • Councilmember Mike O’Brien, Chair: Sustainability and Transportation
  • Councilmember Kshama Sawant, Chair: Energy and Environment

 

For more information on the 2016-17 committee assignments click here. To sign up to receive forthcoming committee agendas via email, click here.

Today’s inauguration ceremony served as an opportunity for the public to witness and participate in their local government. The ceremony was broadcast live on the Seattle Channel and can be viewed beginning tomorrow at http://www.seattlechannel.org/mayor-and-council/city-council/full-council.

# # #

Seattle City Council meetings are cablecast live on Seattle Channel 21, HD Channels 321 Comcast, 721 Wave and on the City Council’s website. Copies of legislation, Council meeting calendar, and archives of news releases can be found on the City Council website. Follow the Council on Twitter and on Facebook.

[View in Council Newsroom]

[Full Post]

Councilmember Sawant City Council Inauguration Speech (as prepared)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 1/4/2016

Councilmember Sawant City Council Inauguration Speech
(as prepared)

SEATTLE – Councilmember Kshama Sawant delivered the following remarks at the Seattle City Council inauguration ceremony on January 4, 2016:

“Sisters and Brothers,

“Socialism is rising.

“Across the U.S. and globally, young people and workers are rejecting corporate politics and capitalism. They are fed up with the deep inequality, brutal racism, and environmental destruction under this system.

“Nationally, Bernie Sanders is running a trailblazing campaign as a Democratic Socialist, calling for a political revolution against the billionaire class.

“‘What is socialism?’ Millions are asking.

“A socialist society would put people before profits, the environment before big oil. A society in which the resources of the major corporations are taken into democratic public ownership, rationally planned for the needs of society as a whole.

“What we’ve built in Seattle over the last 2 years is an example of how working people can organize and fight back against the corporate establishment.

“We have not won everything. But as our victory on the $15/hour minimum wage showed: if we fight, we can win.

“The political system in this country, and in this city, is broken. The same old, business-as-usual politics cannot fix it.

“I take the dangers of Republican right-wing politics very seriously. However, they are only one part of the problem.

“Over decades, Seattle has been dominated by a Democratic Party establishment which has presided over an ever-growing housing crisis in this city, increasing income inequality, the largest gender pay gap in the country, and an unaccountable police force.

“It is time for something new. Working people need our own political party that unambiguously fights for our needs.

“My standing here today is the living proof that, even in the face of hundreds of thousands of dollars of corporate cash, we can elect working class representatives. Thousands of people contributed 10 dollars, 20, 50, and together we set a new record for fundraising in a Seattle City Council race, without taking a penny in corporate money.

“Seattle will continue to set a powerful example of the kind of politics that are needed and possible.

“In this beautiful city, blighted by income and racial inequality, 2016 should be the year we take on the greed of the few, to meet the needs of the many.

“We cannot wait around for the state to act, or be held back by an antiquated, 1930s Washington State Supreme Court decision.

“Seattle can and must pass a millionaire’s tax!

“We need to tax the rich to free up the resources needed for education, transit, and human services!

“The US is the only country in the industrialized world that denies workers paid parental leave, an essential step towards gender equality. We need to pass legislation this year providing all Seattle workers a minimum of 12 weeks of paid family leave.

“We need affordable housing and a bill of tenants’ rights. The crisis of affordable housing will not be solved by helping developers make profits.

“It will require bold social measures like rent control and developing a public alternative to the private housing market by building thousands of city-owned housing units.

“We need to root out police brutality and racial profiling – to put ‘Black Lives Matter’ into practice. This will require a democratically elected community oversight board with full powers over the Police Department, to set policy and subpoena officers.

“We should invest in education and living wage jobs, not a new youth jail!

“Seattle is on its way to a $15 minimum wage. 3 days ago, the minimum wage for workers at McDonald’s and other big corporations went up to $13.  That’s good — but not enough. These same workers need fair scheduling legislation to put an end to abusive scheduling practices.

“I appeal to all working people who are looking to resist the agenda of big business: get organized.

“Join me and Socialist Alternative in our struggle for economic and social justice.

“Let me end with the words of the great fighter and radical, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, ‘The evils of capitalism are as real as the evils of militarism and evils of racism.’ He also said, ‘Call it democracy, or call it democratic socialism, but there must be a better distribution of wealth within this country for all God’s children.’

“Sisters and brothers, now is the time to join our movement to create a better world.

“Solidarity.”

# # #

Seattle City Council meetings are cablecast live on Seattle Channel 21, HD Channels 321 Comcast, 721 Wave and on the City Council’s website. Copies of legislation, Council meeting calendar, and archives of news releases can be found on the City Council website. Follow the Council on Twitter and on Facebook.

 

[View in Council Newsroom]

[Full Post]

Burgess Statement on Court Ruling Upholding Seattle’s Gun Violence Tax

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 12/22/2015

Burgess Statement on Court Ruling Upholding Seattle’s Gun Violence Tax

SEATTLECouncil President Tim Burgess, sponsor of the City’s gun violence tax legislation, issued the following statement in response to King County Superior Court Judge Palmer Robinson’s ruling upholding the tax:

“We established the gun violence tax as a legitimate and appropriate way to raise revenue for gun safety research and prevention programs. The NRA and its allies always oppose these common sense steps to shine light on the gun violence epidemic. They have blocked funding for basic gun safety research at the federal level for decades. But in Seattle it is different. Judge Robinson saw through the NRA’s distorted efforts to put gun industry profits ahead of public safety.”

 

Approved in August, the gun violence tax would require firearms dealers to pay $25 for every firearm sold and $0.05 or $0.02 for every round of ammunition sold, depending on the caliber of ammunition. The City Budget Office estimates the gun violence tax will raise between $300,000 and $500,000 a year to be used for gun violence research and prevention programs.

# # #

Seattle City Council meetings are cablecast live on Seattle Channel 21, HD Channels 321 Comcast, 721 Wave and on the City Council’s website. Copies of legislation, Council meeting calendar, and archives of news releases can be found on the City Council website. Follow the Council on Twitter and on Facebook.

[View in Council Newsroom]

[Full Post]

Seattle City Council Announces 2016 Committee Assignments

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 12/18/2015

Seattle City Council Announces 2016 Committee Assignments

Councilmembers to elect Council President and assign committees on January 4, 2016

SEATTLESeattle City Council announced its tentative plan for committee assignments today, in preparation for work in 2016. Each Councilmember is responsible for chairing a Council committee and managing legislation related to the committee’s focus. Councilmembers also serve as a vice-chair on one committee and as a member on another. Councilmembers can also sponsor legislation on other committees under certain conditions. Committee assignments are made official at the first Full Council meeting of the year, on Monday January 4, 2016, at 2:00 p.m. Councilmembers will also elect their 2016-17 Council President at the meeting. Committee assignments last for two years.

Councilmember Sally Bagshaw will chair the Human Services and Public Health Committee. Councilmember Bagshaw will oversee Council’s work on issues relating to services provided by the Human Services Department, including programs that meet the basic needs of the most vulnerable people in our community. The committee will also consider matters involving public health and Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD), which allows law enforcement officers to redirect low-level offenders engaged in drug or prostitution activity to community-based services.

Councilmember Tim Burgess will chair the Affordable Housing, Neighborhoods and Finance Committee. As chair of this committee, Councilmember Burgess will focus on issues relating to housing—investing and promoting the development and preservation of affordable housing, and building strong neighborhoods through outreach and engagement. Councilmember Burgess will also chair the Budget committee, overseeing the review of the Mayor’s proposed budget.
Councilmember Lorena González will chair the Gender Equity, Safe Communities and New Americans Committee. As chair, Councilmember González will consider policies to address gender equity and help improve the lives of Seattle’s immigrant and refugee residents.  The committee will also focus on fostering safe communities, improving police accountability, crime prevention, criminal justice, emergency preparedness, and fire and medical services.

Councilmember Bruce Harrell will chair the Education, Equity and Governance Committee. As chair, Councilmember Harrell will focus on issues relating to public schools and improving student success rates, intergovernmental relations, technology, ethics and elections, prisoner reentry and equity issues for underserved communities.

Councilmember Lisa Herbold will chair the Civil Rights, Utilities, Economic Development and Arts Committee. Councilmember Herbold’s committee will manage issues relating to labor standards, civil rights, Seattle Public Utilities, and economic development. The committee will also manage issues relating to arts and culture in Seattle, which includes nightlife issues.

Councilmember Rob Johnson will chair the Planning, Land Use and Zoning Committee. As chair of this committee, Councilmember Johnson will take up issues involving City zoning, planning, major institutions, quasi-judicial decisions, community development, and land use regulations.

Councilmember Debora Juarez will chair the Parks, Seattle Center, Libraries and Waterfront Committee. As chair, Councilmember Juarez will focus on issues relating to City parks, community centers, and public grounds, including the Seattle Center.  Her committee will also manage legislation relating to the Seattle Public Library system.  Councilmember Juarez will also chair the Central Waterfront committee.

Councilmember Mike O’Brien will chair the Sustainability and Transportation Committee. Councilmember O’Brien’s committee will handle matters pertaining to city-wide and regional transportation policy and planning. These issues range from pedestrian and bicycle programs, traffic control and parking policies, and overseeing the City’s coordination with regional and state departments of transportation. The committee will also have a shared-focus on Seattle’s Climate Action Plan to reduce carbon emissions.

Councilmember Kshama Sawant will chair the Energy and Environment Committee. Councilmember Sawant’s committee will handle policies relating to Seattle’s energy usage, as well as issues relating to alternative energy sources, air pollution regulation, energy utility rates, and Seattle City Light finances. In addition, Councilmember Sawant will take up matters that relate to climate and environmental protections, conservation programs, and green infrastructure.

 

Standing Committee

Committee Members

Committee Meeting Days and Times

Affordable Housing, Neighborhoods & Finance

Chair:  Tim Burgess
Vice-Chair:  Lisa Herbold
Member:  Rob Johnson
Alternate:  Mike O’Brien

1st and 3rd Wednesdays
9:30 a.m.

Civil Rights, Utilities, Economic Development & Arts

Chair:  Lisa Herbold
Vice-Chair:  Kshama Sawant
Member:  Mike O’Brien
Alternate:  Bruce Harrell

2nd and 4th Tuesdays
9:30 a.m.

Education, Equity & Governance

Chair:  Bruce A. Harrell
Vice-Chair:  Lorena González
Member:  Debora Juarez
Alternate:  Tim Burgess

1st and 3rd Wednesdays
2:00 p.m.

Energy & Environment

Chair:  Kshama Sawant
Vice-Chair:  Debora Juarez
Member:  Lorena González
Alternate:  Sally Bagshaw

2nd and 4th Tuesdays
2:00 p.m.

Gender Equity, Safe Communities & New Americans

Chair:  Lorena Gonzalez
Vice-Chair:  Tim Burgess
Member:  Sally Bagshaw
Alternate:  Debora Juarez

2nd and 4th Wednesdays
9:30 a.m.

Human Services & Public Health

Chair:  Sally Bagshaw
Vice-Chair:  Bruce Harrell
Member:  Tim Burgess
Alternate:  Rob Johnson

2nd and 4th Wednesdays
2:00 p.m.

Parks, Seattle Center, Libraries & Waterfront

Chair:  Debora Juarez
Vice-Chair:  Sally Bagshaw
Member:  Bruce Harrell
Alternate:  Kshama Sawant

1st and 3rd Thursdays
9:30 a.m.

Planning, Land Use & Zoning

Chair:  Rob Johnson
Vice-Chair:  Mike O’Brien
Member:  Lisa Herbold
Alternate:  Lorena González

1st and 3rd Tuesdays
9:30 a.m.

Sustainability & Transportation

Chair:  Mike O’Brien
Vice-Chair:  Rob Johnson
Member:  Kshama Sawant
Alternate:  Lisa Herbold

1st and 3rd Tuesdays 2:00 p.m.

                         
Seattle City Council meetings are cablecast and Webcast live on Seattle Channel 21 and on the City Council’s website. Copies of legislation, Council meeting calendar, and archives of news releases can be found on the City Council website. Follow the Council on Twitter and on Facebook.

[View in Council Newsroom]

[Full Post]

P-I Globe designated a City landmark

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 12/17/2015

P-I Globe designated a City landmark

SEATTLE – Today Mayor Ed Murray’s signed an ordinance designating the P-I Globe as a City landmark, culminating a process that began more than three years ago.

“Since 1948, the P-I Globe has been a familiar icon in this city,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “I’m pleased this landmark will be preserved and remembered for its place in Seattle’s history.”

The P-I Globe was designated a landmark by the Landmarks Preservation Board in April of 2012 when it was nominated by three City Councilmembers at that time – Jean Godden, Tim Burgess and Sally Clark. City staff has been working with the Hearst Corporation, the Globe’s owner, to develop an agreement specifying features to be preserved by the current or future owner and clarified what changes would need to be reviewed by the Landmarks Preservation Board. Once that agreement was completed in June, Mayor Murray and Councilmembers Tim Burgess, Jean Godden and Sally Bagshaw introduced the legislation signed today.

The P-I Globe is a unique sign, designed and manufactured specifically to advertise the Seattle Post-Intelligencer and has been a Seattle icon since it was installed on the Post-Intelligencer building in 1948. The image of the Globe served as the logo for the newspaper appearing on its masthead and on each section of the paper. The Globe was later moved to its present location on Elliott Avenue W in 1986.

– 30 –

Office of the Mayor

[View in Council Newsroom]

[Full Post]

Councilmembers Rasmussen and Bagshaw to Host Panel on Lidding I-5 Near Convention Center Expansion

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 12/15/2015

Councilmembers Rasmussen and Bagshaw to Host Panel on Lidding I-5 Near Convention Center Expansion

SEATTLE – Councilmembers Tom Rasmussen and Sally Bagshaw will host a lunchtime meeting tomorrow to hear concepts about the possibility of lidding portions of Interstate-5 near the Pike-Pine Corridor.

The Pike-Pine Urban Neighborhood Council (PPUNC) and the Northwest Urbanist will show potential uses of the area above the freeway, funding options and examples of other freeway lids around the country.

Interest in lidding the freeway blocks north of the current Washington State Convention Center has increased due to the Convention Center’s planned expansion onto the Convention Place Station site.

The $1.4 billion Convention Center addition is expected to reinvigorate the neighborhood by bringing activity and tens of thousands of visitors to the area annually. While the Convention Center addition is an independent project from a full lid across Interstate 5, the new facility will bridge a portion of the freeway at Boren Avenue and Pine Street. Members of the Pike-Pine neighborhood want to lid the remaining gaps between Downtown and Capitol Hill.

 

WHAT:
Panel discussion on Interstate-5 lidding opportunities

WHEN
Wednesday, December 16
12 p.m.

WHERE:
Seattle City Hall
Council Chambers, Second Floor
600 4th Ave., Seattle 98104

WHO:
Seattle City Councilmember Tom Rasmussen
Seattle City Councilmember Sally Bagshaw
Council Transportation Committee Meeting Members
Pike Pine Urban Neighborhood Council
Northwest Urbanist

# # #

Seattle City Council meetings are cablecast live on Seattle Channel 21, HD Channels 321 Comcast, 721 Wave and on the City Council’s website. Copies of legislation, Council meeting calendar, and archives of news releases can be found on the City Council website. Follow the Council on Twitter and on Facebook.

[View in Council Newsroom]

[Full Post]
© 1995-2018 City of Seattle