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Tag: Conlin

Seattle City Council passes South Lake Union rezone

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 5/6/2013
Council President Sally J. Clark
Councilmember Sally Bagshaw
Councilmember Tim Burgess
Councilmember Richard Conlin
Councilmember Jean Godden
Councilmember Bruce Harrell
Councilmember Mike O’…

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City Council Town Hall Meeting on Climate Action Tomorrow

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 5/6/2013
Council President Sally J. Clark
Councilmember Sally Bagshaw
Councilmember Tim Burgess
Councilmember Richard Conlin
Councilmember Jean Godden
Councilmember Bruce Harrell
Councilmember Nick Li…

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City Council to host second meeting on micro-housing developments

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 5/1/2013
Councilmember Tom Rasmussen
Council President Sally J. Clark
Councilmember Nick Licata
Councilmember Richard Conlin
City Council to host second meeting on micro-housing developments
Public invited to…

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City Councilmembers to vote on gun safety public health funding

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 4/30/2013
City Councilmembers to vote on gun safety public health funding
Seattle – The City Council’s Government Performance and Finance Committee will consider tomorrow morning an amendment to budget legislation to fund …

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City Council Adopts Food Action Plan

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 4/29/2013
Councilmember Richard Conlin
City Council Adopts Food Action Plan
Plan aims to increase access to healthy food, support local food production and strengthen local economy
SEATTLE – Seattle City Council today…

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City Council Strengthens Affordable Housing Program in South Lake Union

City of Seattle
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 4/22/2013

Council President Sally J. Clark
Councilmember Sally Bagshaw
Councilmember Tim Burgess
Councilmember Richard Conlin
Councilmember Jean Godden
Councilmember Bruce Harrell
Councilmember Nick Licata
Councilmember Mike O’Brien
Councilmember Tom Rasmussen

City Council Strengthens Affordable Housing Program
in South Lake Union

Consensus built around the need for more affordable workforce housing in the neighborhood

Seattle The Seattle City Council South Lake Union Committee voted unanimously on an amendment to produce more workforce affordable housing in the South Lake Union (SLU) neighborhood by strengthening the incentive zoning program. The agreement is a compromise between two existing amendments offered by Councilmembers, which were introduced in last week’s SLU Committee meeting. Consensus was built around the need to strengthen the incentive zoning program without discouraging development.

“Today’s decision is an important, modest step toward securing more affordable workforce housing in South Lake Union, so that people at all income levels who work in the neighborhood have a chance to live there,” said Councilmember Mike O’Brien. “This is a community of opportunity where the city is investing over $500 million in public infrastructure, and I think it only fair that the benefits of this redevelopment are shared more broadly.”

The legislation to strengthen incentive zoning includes a 43% increase in the residential pay-in-lieu price (from $15.15 to $21.68), effectively immediately, and a 33% increase in the commercial price that will be phased in over eighteen months (to $29.71). These prices are paid on a percent of square-foot basis in exchange for additional height and building capacity. Collectively, these provisions will produce an estimated 733 units of workforce housing in and near the neighborhood. The original legislation would have created an estimated 406 units.

“After collaborating with local businesses and affordable housing advocates, we crafted a sensible solution that goes far beyond the Mayor’s status quo proposal and brings affordable workforce housing to the City’s hottest real estate market,” said Councilmember Tim Burgess. “Now many more nurses, school teachers, construction workers and other working families can call this booming neighborhood home.”

“The Council’s adjustments in this legislation and the overall commitment to seeing workforce-priced units actually built in these developments will  help more working people find homes in South Lake Union near jobs and transit,” said Council President Sally J. Clark. “That’s good for employees and good for employers.”
              
“The new Affordable Housing Amendment reflects a collaborative and inclusive decision-making process with developers and affordable housing advocates. The Council applied the Race and Social Justice Initiative lens to ensure we were having an honest debate on equity. Council honored its promise of delivering on-site affordable workforce units in this neighborhood,” said Councilmember Bruce Harrell.

“These amendments strengthen one of our tools to generate more workforce housing in South Lake Union,” said Councilmember Richard Conlin, chair of the Special Committee on South Lake Union. “I look forward to working with stakeholders and housing experts to both refine our incentive zoning program and also increase the supply of affordable housing city-wide.”

“It all goes back to why so many people come to Seattle — they come because we are a city of inclusive neighborhoods, not just a copy of someplace else. A strengthened incentive zoning program reaffirms our commitment to inclusive and affordable neighborhoods,” said Councilmember Jean Godden.

“These amendments, while not a bold leap, are reasonable steps in the right direction. This is only a modest beginning for making housing in Seattle more affordable for average folks,” said Councilmember Nick Licata. “We cannot continue to see workers forced to move ever further from the city and drive long distances to work here. The solution is clearly to require developers to provide substantially more affordable housing.”

The Council last updated the incentive zoning program in 2008, establishing the goal of producing 5% of affordable workforce residential units in the neighborhood of the development. The Council will also consider similar fee adjustments to the downtown incentive housing program to take effect in 2014.

“Even with this step, we need to go further by engaging in the process laid out in Resolution 31444 to review and update of Seattle’s incentive zoning and other affordable housing programs, so we can begin to bridge the gap between our affordable housing needs and the amount we are currently producing,” said Councilmember Mike O’Brien.

City Council plans to vote on the full South Lake Union rezone proposal at the May 6 Full Council meeting at 2:00pm in Council Chambers.

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City Opposes Genetically Engineered Salmon

City of Seattle
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 4/22/2013

Councilmember Richard Conlin

City Opposes Genetically Engineered Salmon

SeattleSeattle City Council adopted a resolution today opposing the commercial production of genetically engineered (GE) salmon.  A proposal is currently before the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that would allow GE salmon commercial production. The Mayor concurred with the resolution.

The City’s action supports a bipartisan coalition, supported by Senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell, which is seeking to ban the genetically engineered fish or require it to be labeled as transgenic. More than 400,000 fishermen, environmentalists, food safety advocates and others have written to the FDA with concerns about the FDA’s preliminary finding that this project should be allowed to proceed.

“This is a threat to the livelihood of Northwest and Alaska fishermen,” said Councilmember Richard Conlin, sponsor of the resolution. “I’m also deeply concerned about potential health concerns related to consuming genetically engineered salmon.  That’s why we felt the need to act.”

AquaBounty Technologies Inc., is seeking permission from the FDA to alter Atlantic salmon with genes taken from the Pacific Chinook salmon and the eel-like Ocean Pout. Adding these growth genes from other species causes fish to produce growth hormones continuously, allowing them to grow larger and faster than natural salmon.

The Swinomish Indian Tribal Community is also alarmed about this proposal. Chairman Brian Cladoosby, said, “Genetically engineered salmon pose a grave threat to the environment and to the health of the general population. We strongly believe that it would be an error for the FDA to accept the unsupported “guarantee” that all genetically engineered fish can be contained and not adversely impact people, the wild salmon species and the environment. “

“Salmon are an important part of Seattle’s environment, our heritage, and our economy,” said Mayor Mike McGinn. “I stand with fishermen, environmentalists and food safety advocates to protect salmon and the public from genetic modification.”

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City Council to host Town Hall Meeting on Climate Action

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 4/22/2013

Council President Sally J. Clark
Councilmember Sally Bagshaw
Councilmember Tim Burgess
Councilmember Richard Conlin
Councilmember Jean Godden
Councilmember Bruce Harrell
Councilmember Nick Licata
Cou…

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City Council Introduces Climate Action Plan on Earth Day

City of Seattle
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 4/22/2013

Councilmember Mike O’Brien
Council President Sally Clark
Councilmember Richard Conlin

City Council Introduces Climate Action Plan on Earth Day
Plan provides pathway to carbon neutrality by 2050

SeattleSeattle City Council introduced Seattle’s Climate Action Plan today, outlining the City’s path to meeting its goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2050. The Plan focuses on three sectors where the City of Seattle can have the greatest influence in reducing carbon emissions: transportation and land use, building energy and solid waste. The Plan also includes a section on how the City should prepare for the impacts of climate disruption we currently experience, as well a section on actions individuals can take to reduce emissions through purchasing decisions.

“Taking climate action is not about austerity. It is about creating great places to live, work and play today and for future generations,” said Councilmember Mike O’Brien, Chair of the Energy and Environment Committee. “This Climate Action Plan provides a vision for a city that is vibrant, economically prosperous and socially just.” 

“The strong actions in this plan are evidence of the high value that the Seattle community places on sustainability,” said Jill Simmons, Director of the Office of Sustainability and Environment. “Throughout the planning process, we heard from individuals and organizations who encouraged us to be bold and think long-term.”

Seattle’s Office of Sustainability and Environment has been developing the Climate Action Plan since 2011, engaging grassroots sustainability groups, environmental leaders and business and community members from across the city. The City also formed Technical Advisory Groups in each sector addressed in the Plan and convened a Green Ribbon Commission to recommend specific climate actions.

“With its natural beauty, strong economy and commitment to equity, Seattle is an amazing place to live. The Climate Action Plan lays out clear path to ensuring Seattle remains a great place to live and raise a family, while also doing its part to combat climate change,” said Doris Koo, Co-Chair of the Seattle Green Ribbon Commission. 
“Even before the first Earth Day in 1970, Seattleites have taken pride in our city’s commitment to protecting the environment through innovative thinking, hard work and zeal,” said Seattle City Council President Sally J. Clark. “I’m proud we can introduce our Climate Action Plan on Earth Day, 2013, as yet another milestone in our city’s dedication to making a difference for the planet.”

The Climate Action Plan includes specific short- and long-term actions the City needs to meet its ambitious goal of carbon neutrality by 2050. For example, the transportation sector accounts for 40% of Seattle’s greenhouse gas emissions, but the biggest challenge Seattle faces to reducing emissions in this sector is funding. The plan calls for new funding sources like extending the Bridging the Gap levy and securing local authority for a motor vehicle excise tax (MVET) to help improve bus service and reliability, invest in improvements that make it easier and safer to walk or bike and take steps to build out the region’s light rail system. The plan also calls for supporting the adoption of low carbon vehicles and fuels.

In the building energy section, the Plan calls for accelerating Seattle’s work to make energy use more visible to consumers by switching to smart meters, providing better energy performance information to building owners and users and generally helping people better understand and manage their energy consumption. Additionally, the Plan calls for getting the right mix of policies and incentives to spur retrofitting in Seattle’s housing stock and commercial buildings.

“We have already seen the impact of a changing climate. We must act now to slow down the rate of climate change, and to respond to the issues as our climate is affected,” said Councilmember Richard Conlin. “Together we can rise to this great moral challenge, take practical steps in the right direction, inspire others to emulate our example and build a positive future for Seattle.”

“Seattle residents and businesses are leaders in the fight against climate change,” said Mayor Mike McGinn. “I appreciate the hard work done by our citizen committee to craft recommendations for our updated plan and look forward to the Council’s process for adopting the strongest possible Climate Action Plan. I thank Councilmembers O’Brien and Conlin for their leadership in this effort.”

The Climate Action Plan will be discussed in two Energy and Environment Committee meetings–Tuesday, April 23 and Tuesday, May 14–and will also be the topic of a public town hall on Tuesday, May 7 from 6:00pm to 8:00pm at University Heights Center.

The Climate Action Plan can be viewed online at: http://www.seattle.gov/environment/climate_plan.htm

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Councilmember Conlin Encourages Participation at Happiness Open House

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 4/19/2013
Councilmember Richard Conlin
Councilmember Conlin Encourages Participation at Happiness Open House
Seattle — Seattle City Councilmember Richard Conlin will sponsor a Happiness Open House on Monday, April 22.&nbsp…

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