• Search Council Connection



  • Council Photostream



    Archives





Councilmember Lisa Herbold to Introduce Anti-Displacement Ordinance

Councilmember Lisa Herbold (District 1, West Seattle, South Park) will introduce an anti-displacement ordinance that would authorize additional displacement mitigation for housing projects located in South Park, Rainier Beach, Othello, Bitter Lake, and Westwood-Highland Park. These neighborhoods have been identified as having a high risk of displacement and low access to opportunity, according to Growth and Equity: Analyzing Impacts on Displacement and Opportunity Related to Seattle’s Growth Strategy, in the Comprehensive Plan Seattle 2035, an analysis conducted by the Office of Planning and Community Development.

“I appreciate Mayor Durkan’s efforts to address the displacement impacts of development by proposing to introduce legislation that the Council requested in 2017 by Resolution 31754.  As described in the March 2018 status report to the Council, a community preferences policy will be useful for our non-profit developers.  Nevertheless, we also desperately need a tool to address the displacement that occurs when for-profit developers build.  Displacement is a challenging issue and we need many tools to address it,” said Councilmember Lisa Herbold (District 1, West Seattle and South Park).

Councilmember Herbold will this week send the proposed bill to the Council’s Introduction and Referral Calendar. Herbold has requested that the Council hear this bill concurrently with the MHA Citywide legislation.

“This ordinance would use authority granted under the State Environmental Protection Act (SEPA) to create a requirement for developers to mitigate the impacts resulting from the loss of affordable housing in those areas of the city that, if we didn’t do so, the result would be a failure to fulfill our obligation to ‘affirmatively promote fair housing’ — in other words, in areas where disproportionate displacement of communities of color and other protected classes is likely to occur,” Herbold said.  See upper left-hand corner of image.

MHA Framework legislation, passed in 2016, Section 2.A.2.a, stated: The Council intends to consider whether to include higher performance and payment amounts, subject to statutory limits, for those areas where the increase in development capacity would be likely to increase displacement risk.  Resolution 31733, passed in 2017, stated: The Council intends to consider a range of strategies to increase affordable units sufficient to offset the affordable units at risk of demolition due to new development.

“I’m proud that the Council has a long legislative record of its commitment to address displacement. Now it’s time to act again,” Herbold continued.

“I have, over the years, expressed my great concern that the City describes MHA as ‘housing displacement mitigation tool,’ but has badly analyzed how development removes more affordable housing than the resources from MHA are sufficient to replace.

“For example, in the case of the University District MHA upzone in 2017, the City estimated that only 40-275 units of existing affordable units of housing would be demolished over 20 years.   The EIS estimated likely demolition by identifying specific redevelopable parcels and quantifying their existing housing (zero, for parking lots and commercial buildings).  The “full build out” scenario wherein construction occurs on all redevelopable parcels to the full capacity of the proposed rezone was estimated to result in the demolition of 275 homes over 20 years.  In less than 2 years, based upon a Council Central Staff analysis of new development projects that are currently in some stage of having their Master Use Permit issued or Early Design Guidance reviewed and that are subject to the new zoning put in place in 2017, 96 units of affordable units are already planned for demolition.

“Using the same approach used in the University District in 2017, the City estimates that over 20 years 574 units of housing will be demolished in MHA rezone areas.  My concerns about displacement today are heightened, especially considering how far afield the University District estimate has proven to be.”

Comments

Pingback from Durkan, Herbold take on displacement
Time February 20, 2019 at 6:58 pm

[…] member Herbold followed Durkan’s announcement with her own, saying that she would be introducing legislation that would authorize displacement mitigations for […]

Pingback from Join HPAC in Supporting Councilmember Lisa Herbold’s Anti-Displacement Ordinance | Highland Park Action Committee
Time February 21, 2019 at 1:26 pm

[…] See full Press Release […]

Pingback from Just when you think you know how they're going to upzone, they change it again | Wallyhood
Time March 6, 2019 at 1:51 pm

[…] to make way for more luxury accommodations, displacement is a real concern. A recent study of the U District upzone that was passed in 2017, showed a much greater loss of affordable housing than the… And studies have shown that increasing density does not magically create a decrease in rent […]

© 1995-2018 City of Seattle