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    Survey Says . . . Public Safety, Education, Transportation

    2013 budget logo

    Correction: the survey summary as originally posted contained an error in calculations on the chart and graph of per capita respondents by zip code on pages 14 and 15. The information has now been corrected.

    Last Wednesday we closed our online, non-scientific survey of residents about the 2013-2014 City budget. We’ve spent the last few days compiling the results into a summary presentation, which you can view here

    The survey asked 19 questions regarding priorities for city spending, what residents value most about their neighborhoods and how they feel about city services.

    The results show that people want to be safe, they want good schools and they want to be able to get around town in a variety of ways. Respondents gave public safety, public schools and transportation the highest ranks when asked to order the “most important” local government services and, separately, the priorities “local government should focus on.”

    Slightly more than half of survey participants believed the City was “responsive” (26.6%) or “becoming more responsive” (25.8%) to the needs of Seattle’s most vulnerable residents.

    Here is a graphic that highlights some of the words survey participants used in writing what they liked most about their neighborhood. The larger the word in the graphic, the more often it was used:

    Survey wordcloud

    The chart below shows residents’ basic satisfaction levels with city government services:

    Survey chart

    This survey gives us another window into what matters most to the residents of Seattle. More than 1,000 Seattle residents responded to the non-scientific survey, which was available online and promoted via blogs, newsletters and handouts at community events around the city. The Council also received hundreds of e-mails and phone calls about the budget and heard hours of testimony at public hearings.

    The Council will vote on its amendments to the Mayor’s budget proposal later this week.